Chevrolet LTG crate motor puts a 2-liter turbo four in hotrodders hands; Chevy shows the Nova 2.0

Chevrolet prepped a 1967 Nova SS showcase a two-liter turbocharged four-cylinder crate engine available from Chevrolet Performance. The car is called the Chevrolet Nova 2.0. (click to enlarge)

Chevrolet prepped a 1967 Nova SS showcase a two-liter turbocharged four-cylinder crate engine available from Chevrolet Performance. The car is called the Chevrolet Nova 2.0. (click to enlarge)

Now to find a 1967 Chevrolet Nova.

Chevrolet has a new crate motor—a complete run-ready engine ready for installation—that isn’t the familiar Chevy smallblock V-8 loved by street rodders, hot rodders and whatever other rodders one might have. Instead, it’s a direct-injected 2.0-liter turbocharged four. Chevrolet built it, in fact, to replace the V-8. And to prove its worth Chevrolet engineers installed it in a classic Chevy Nova.

The new engine, dubbed “LTG,” is rated at 272 horsepower. That’s just three ponies shy of the 275-hp 327 (5.3-liter) V-8 that powered the hot ’67 Nova SS. And it’s a lot more powerful than the 195-hp 283 (4.6-liter) V-8 also offered in the Chevy II Nova.

Chevrolet Performance shows off the LTG crate motor in the custom 1967 Chevy Nova 2.0. (click to enlarge)

Chevrolet Performance shows off the LTG crate motor in the custom 1967 Chevy Nova 2.0. (click to enlarge)

Thanks to its light weight, the Nova SS was worth its weight in cherry Cokes, one of the quicker shorts at the drive-in. The aluminum two-liter turbo four, however, reduces the weight of the Nova below the original 3100 pound curb weight with original cast iron V-8. Chevy claims the turbo four can go 0-60 mph in 6.2 seconds, substantially quicker than the Nova SS back in the day.

And as an added bonus, swapping aluminum the iron lump also changes the weight distribution to a neatly balanced 50/50 front to rear.

The Nova 2.0, as Chevrolet corporate hot rodders are calling their creation, obviously had fun with making it a proper hot rod (and, we’ll add, getting paid for it), adding a billet aluminum grille, narrowed and tucked bumpers, shaved door handles with electronic latch releases, custom satin bronze 17-inch Z/28-style wheels, and four-wheel disc brakes. They also brought the suspension up to date with height-adjustable air bags, front and rear, and a triangulated 4-link design in the rear.

The LTG crate engine, the electronic control unit and the engine accessory-drive system, along with an installation kit, are from Chevrolet Performance, as is a six-speed manual transmission matched to the engine.

The only thing left is to find the proper host…or not. Is this where hotrodding is going? And if it is, should it? And do you know where to find a 1967 Chevrolet Nova?